People

Principal investigators

Colin Please

Colin is Professor of Applied Mathematics. He is interested in modelling of many practical industrial problems using continuum models, in particular in using asymptotic methods to derive reduced models that can be readily interpreted and easily parametrised.

Jon Chapman

Jon Chapman is the Professor of Mathematics and its Applications. His research interests centre on mathematical modelling and asymptotic analysis, with applications in industry and the physical and biological sciences, using mainly partial differential equations.

Postdoctoral researchers

Dr Matthew G. Hennessy

Matt is a Hooke Research Fellow. He is interested in continuum modelling of physical systems, with focus on soft matter and lithium-ion batteries, and applying asymtotic and numerical methods to gain new insights.

Dr Robert Timms

Robert is currently a Postdoctoral Research Assistant at the Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford. His research focuses on the Mathematical Modelling of Batteries, and is being conducted within the Multi-Scale Mathematical Modelling Fast Start Project of the Faraday Institution. He is also a key member of the core PyBaMM development team.

Dr Toby L. Kirk

Toby is a Postdoctoral Research Assistant in the Mathematical Institute at the University of Oxford, and part of the Multi-Scale Mathematical Modelling Fast Start Project of the Faraday Institution. His current research is using asymptotic methods to account for electrode heterogeneity in lithium-ion battery models.

Graduate students

Alexander Van-Brunt

Alexander is a DPhil student in partial differential equations specialising in finite element analysis. He is working in collaboration with the Monroe group to formulate a general, multi-physical numerical framework for modelling electrolyte transport within a variety of potential future chemistries for batteries.

Scott Marquis

Scott is DPhil candidate in Applied Mathematics. He is working in collaboration with Siemens to develop efficient reduced-order mathematical models of lithium-ion batteries. He is also a key member of the core PyBaMM development team.

Alumni

Ian Roper

Ian completed a DPhil in Applied Mathematics in 2019. His research was focused on the mechanical behaviour of silicon anodes in lithium-ion batteries.

Valentin Sulzer

Tino completed a DPhil in Applied Mathematics in 2019. He is now pursuing a postdoc in Anna Stefanopoulou’s battery group at the University of Michigan. He also remains a key member of the core PyBaMM development team.

Collaborators